Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Use of Brackets in Quotations

 

If you would like to add or change something in a quotation, place any changes you make in brackets:

·       To fit your sentence (verb tense; capitalization)

·       For further clarification (a definition or an explanation):

 

Altering Capitalization:

*We learn of the harmful effects of gambling when Gold and Ferrell reveal that “[c]ompulsive gambling has been linked to child abuse, domestic violence, [. . .] and a host of other criminal and social ills” (608).

 

Clarification:

The lure of the possible win and the inability to let it go is revealed when we learn that “[a]t 11 P.M. on a Tuesday night, with a bankroll of $55 [. . .] [Rex] is at a poker table in Gardenia. [. . .]  [H]e talks about leaving, getting some sleep.  Midnight comes and goes” (Gold and Ferrell 612).

 

Do It!: 

 

Use the following quotes [Shiflett’s], and alter for clarification;

 “Yet, when we see ourselves denounced by our detractors, it is as if an alien race were being described” (153).

 


Brackets Quiz:

 

Alter the quote below two times.  You can clarify, add or change to fit your lead—in.  Take care to have an effective lead—in that introduces the source and states your point.

 

“We believe these charges are grossly overexaggerated, and we also reject the assertion that our beloved tanks are killing machines” (153).


In his essay “Gorgeous, Guzzling and Grand:  SUVs and Those who love them, Dave Shiflett, freelance writer whose essay appeared in National Review expresses his feelings about the stigma of driving an SUV:  “[T]hese charges are grossly overexaggerated, and we [SUV drivers] also reject the assertion that our beloved tanks [SUVs] are killing machines” (153).